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ART + SCIENCE event online

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We've finished our first Digital Art + Science event! Blue Ceiling dance’s Art + Science events were originally public events at Swansea Town Hall in Toronto, bringing together work in progress from the dance company and casual presentations and discussions with local scientists about their work. We aimed to spark conversations about creativity and the processes of making art and doing science in a relaxed, fun atmosphere. With the restrictions surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic, we decided to try a different way. At first we thought we would just film the same kind of things that happened in-person, but what evolved was a more impressionistic approach. The contribution of theoretical ecologist and writer Dr. Madhur Anand shaped our Art + Science Event #3, as she offered readings from her new book “This Red Line Goes Straight to Your Heart”, a poetic text full of science. click on photo to take you to the video Blue Ceiling dance shows excerpts from our rehearsals and research for “

Madhur Anand: the complex systems of poetry and ecology

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Dr. Madhur Anand is a Canadian poet and a professor of theoretical ecology at the University of Guelph. Her topics of research include coupled human-environment systems and forest and forest-grassland mosaic ecosystems, and especially how sources of stress and disturbance, such as agriculture and climate change, impact these ecosystems across different spatial scales and time scales. She uses simulation modelling, statistical tools, dendrochronology, and other observational methods. Her two poetic books, "A New Index for Predicting Catastrophes" and "This Red Line Goes Straight to Your Heart" have been nominated for awards and included many "best books" lists.  Her publications in science and poetry are too numerous to cite here, so read more about Dr. Anand here: https://anand-lab-globalecochange.uoguelph.ca/ and here: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/authors/259994/madhur-anand/ Having read both her books since our interview in the spring of 2020, I ca

Brian Eames and Jean-Sebastien Gauthier -- Immersive Evolution and Potency of Sci-Art

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Based in Saskatoon, Brian Eames is an evolutionary biologist in the field of cellular development of bones. In the Eames Lab at the University of Saskatchewan, they use molecular genetics and advanced imaging techniques to understand how skeletal tissues develop and evolve. A general focus of the lab is on skeletal differentiation, particularly between bone and cartilage.   Jean-Sebastien Gauthier is an artist born and raised in Saskatoon, the grandson of prominent Saskatoon sculptor Bill Epp. He grew up working and learning in his grandfather’s foundry. At Concordia University, Jean-Sebastien expanded his practice as a sculptor into multi-media and interactive arts experiences. He currently resides in Saskatoon. Together they have created installation works of art combining scientific imaging, immersive art experiences, evolution and a strong desire to inspire people to see themselves in all living things. JS Gauthier and Brian Eames collaboration "Still Life" We spoke over

in fallibility -- a second poem

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 Another step towards sharing more concrete thoughts and discoveries from my recent Chalmers Fellowship and Professional Development grant with Canada Council for the Arts: poem #2. I'm not sure if I'm shying away from  prose because now is a time you must have an opinion, but you also must be ready to have it be torn apart. So I don my poetry dress, just as I live in a contemporary dance world where individual interpretation is the goal. This is also the underlying theme of the poem: do not fear mistakes. Don't hold on to them, deny them or beat yourself up about them.  Lucy Rupert in "the animals are planning an intervention" photo by Melanie Gordon lighting by Michelle Ramsay in fallibility It is time to make mistakes. We don’t have to know everything Who ever told us we did?   Birds are flying north And flies are kissing on our glass table And the vines still grow fiercely Despite A wrong word A stumbling haze that spawned An error You recognize it, even as it

standing on fishes -- by Lucy Rupert

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Over the past ten years, I have enjoyed interviewing artists and scientists so much that I have not dedicated much of this blog specifically to my own writing. I used to write quite a bit. I wrote and performed my own music at places like Graffitis and the Freetimes Cafe. I wrote poetry and short stories. Sometimes I was published. Like many people right now, I have had a lot of time and space to reflect. I have been writing again. This poem started as a brainstorm for a new solo dance I am creating and its title is a nod to Rainer Maria Rilke. I also acknowledge the soft, Irish nudge of the late John O'Donohue. **** Lucy Rupert in dead reckoning, 2016 photo by Omer Yukseker standing on fishes a fence of slippery parts snaps into shape flat instant grounding             made of lost ideas, the things that don't tether       while soles hang on. the dancer        hard-worked these 25 years       has been waiting unknowingly                          

Peter Chin: Cultivating a global view, building a dance centre

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INTERVIEW WITH PETER CHIN OCTOBER 2019 written and compiled by Lucy Rupert Peter Chin at Pre Rup temple while making dance film (2020) Peter Chin, artistic director of Tribal Crackling Wind, dancer, choreographer and multidisciplinary artist, has been splitting his time between Canada and Cambodia for many years. Currently he is developing a new performance work “Trillionth I”, with dancers and musicians from Cambodia, Canada, Mexico and Italy. “Trillionth I” embodies subtle influences of community hopes and fears to reveal the universal energy between us all, and the healing that is possible through transmission of that energy in live performance. Last summer Tribal Crackling Wind performed excerpts in Allen Gardens and in the fall, performed excerpts of the work in a presenters’ showcase at Fall For Dance North, and as part of Nuit Blanche, outside the Royal Ontario Museum. Although “Trillionth I"  lost its planned trajectory due to the global pandemic, the w